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THE USA VISA



United States Details

  • United States capital / capital of United States - Washington, D.C.
  • United States population / population of United States - 2017 estimate 324,582,000
  • United States people - American
  • United States language - English
  • United States currency - United States dollar ($) (USD)
  • The visa policy of the United States deals with the requirements which a foreign national wishing to enter the United States must meet to obtain a visa, which is a permit to travel to, enter and remain in the United States. Visitors to the United States must obtain a visa from one of the United States diplomatic missions unless they come from one of the visa exempt countries or Visa Waiver Program countries.
us visa
  • Do not take too lightly the influence the USA visa can have on the result of your adventure! For example, you will experience the unfamiliar immigration rules and practices, strange job application procedures, bizarre job selection trends and weird management culture.
  • Most visits to the USA are trouble-free but you should be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate international terrorist attacks, which could be against civilian targets, including places frequented by foreigners. The USA authorities have carried out a number of arrests as a result of investigations into terrorist networks.

DIFFERENT VISA TYPES

  • There are several visas that a foreign national may apply for to be lawfully admitted into the United States, either temporarily or permanently. A few of the commonly utilized visa categories are outlined below. This information is meant as an overview and is not in any way a detailed analysis of United States immigration law.

Temporary Visas

  1. B-1/B-2 Tourist/Visitor Visas
    • Available to all visitors coming to the U.S for business or pleasure. B-1 business visitor visas are for a short duration and must not involve local employment. Nationals of certain countries may be eligible to visit the US for up to 90 days without obtaining a visa.
  2. E-1/E-2 Treaty and Investor Visas
    • Investors and traders and their employees may receive visas to carry on their businesses in the US if their home country has a commercial treaty with the US conferring visa eligibility.
  3. F-1 and M-1 Student Visas
    • Persons seeking to pursue a full course of study at a school in the United States may be eligible for a visa for the course of their study plus, in some cases, a period for practical training in their field of study.
  4. H-1B Specialty Occupation (Professionals) Visas
    • Professional workers with at least a bachelor's degree (or its equivalent work experience) may be eligible for a non-immigrant visa if their employers can demonstrate that they are to be paid at least the prevailing wage for the position.
  5. J-1 and Q-1 Exchange Visitor Visas
    • Persons coming to the US in an approved exchange program may be eligible for the J-1 Exchange Visitor's visa. J-1 programs often cover students, short-term scholars, business trainees, teachers, professors and research scholars, specialists, international visitors, government visitors, camp counselors and au pairs. In some cases, participation in a J-1 program will be coupled with the requirement that the beneficiary spend at least two years outside of the US before being permitted to switch to a different nonimmigrant visa or to permanent residency. We regularly handle the application process for seeking a waiver to the home residency requirement that applies to many J-1 visa holders.
  6. K-1 Fiancé(e) Visas
    • A Fiancé(e) of a US citizen is eligible for a non-immigrant visa conditioned on the conclusion of the marriage within 90 days.
  7. L-1 Intracompany Transfer Visas
    • L-1 visas are available to executives, managers and specialized knowledge employees transferring to their employer's U.S. affiliate. Executives and managers holding L-1 visas may be eligible for permanent residency without the need to a labor certification.
  8. O-1 Extraordinary Ability Worker Visas
    • The O-1 category is set aside for foreign nationals with extraordinary ability. This includes entertainers, athletes, scientists, and businesspersons
  9. P-1 Artists and Athletes Visas
    • This category covers athletes, artists and entertainers.
  10. R-1 Religious Worker Visas
    • Religious workers may be eligible for an R-1 visa.
  11. TC and TN NAFTA and US-Canada Free Trade Agreement Visas
    • A special visa category has been set up for nationals of Canada and Mexico under the provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement.

Permanent Residency Visas ("Green Cards")

  1. Family Sponsored Immigration Visas
    • U.S. citizens may petition for spouses, parents, children and siblings. Permanent residents may petition for spouses and children.
  2. EB-1 Foreign Nationals of Extraordinary Ability, Outstanding Professors and Researchers and Multinational Executives and Managers
    • Individuals in this category can petition for permanent residency without having to go through the time consuming labor certification process.
  3. EB-2 Workers with Advanced Degrees or Exceptional Ability in the Sciences, Arts or Business
    • Visa holders in this category normally must have a job offer and the potential employer must complete the labor certification process. The labor certification involves a testing of the job market to demonstrate that the potential visa holder is not taking a job away from a U.S. worker. In cases where an individual can show that his entry is in the national interest, the job offer and labor certification requirements can be waived.
  4. EB-3 Skilled Workers and Professionals
    • Visa holders in this category normally must have a job offer and the potential employer must complete the labor certification process.
  5. EB-4 Special Immigrant Visas for Religious Workers
    • Ministers of religion are eligible for permanent residency.
  6. EB-5 Investor/Employment Creation Visas
    • Under the 1990 Immigration Act, Congress has set aside up to 10,000 visas per year for alien investors in new commercial enterprises who create employment for ten individuals. There are two groups of investors under the program - those who invest at least $500,000 in "targeted employment areas" (rural areas or areas experiencing unemployment of at least 150% of the national average rate) and those who invest $1,000,000 anywhere else. No fewer than 3,000 of the annual allotment of visas must go to targeted employment areas.
  7. DV-1 Visas (the "Green Card Lottery")
    • 55,000 visas are annually allotted in a random drawing to individuals from nations underrepresented in the total immigrant pool.

HOW TO APPLY

Step 1:

  • For Nonimmigrant Visa applicants: Determine your visa type by reading Common Nonimmigrant Visas. Each visa type explains the qualifications and application items. Choose the visa type that applies to your situation.
  • Be sure to also review the Visa Waiver Program. If your country participates in the Visa Waiver Program, you do not need to apply for a visa if you are travelling for business or pleasure and will only be staying in the Unites States for 90 days or less.

Note : If you are under 14 or over 79 years old, or if you previously received a U.S. visa that expired within the last 48 months or 12 months and you are returning to the United States for the same purpose of travel, you may be able to obtain a visa without coming to the consulate for an interview.

Step 2:

  • The next step is to complete the Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form. Be sure to read the Guidelines for Completing the DS-160 Form carefully. All information must be correct and accurate. Once the form is submitted, you cannot make any changes. If you need assistance, please consult an immigration lawyer or translator. The call center cannot help you complete your DS-160. You will need your DS-160 number to book your appointment

Note : If denied visa previously please complete a new Nonimmigrant Visa Electronic Application (DS-160) form.

Step 3:

  • Once you have determined the correct visa type and completed the DS-160, you must pay the visa fee. Check how to make your visa fee payment. You will create a profile and must keep your receipt number to book your visa appointment.

Step 4:

  • You are almost ready to schedule your visa appointment! Now you will need to login to your profile with the same credentials you used to pay your visa fee. Once you are in the system, you will see your dashboard Schedule Appointment will start the process for scheduling your appointment. You must schedule two appointments, one for the Visa Application Center (VAC) and one for the visa interview at the Embassy or Consulate.First, schedule your visa interview appointment at the Embassy or Consulate
  • Second, schedule your appointment at a Visa Application Centre. This appointment will allow you to go to one of the five Visa Application Centre locations to have your fingerprints and photo taken. This appointment must be at least 1 day before your visa interview appointment at the Embassy or Consulate. You will need three pieces of information in order to schedule your appointment:
    • Your passport number
    • The date you paid your fee
    • The ten (10) digit barcode number from your DS-160 confirmation page
    • As you go through the process you will be able to select your visa type, enter personal data, add dependents, select your document delivery location, confirm visa payment, and schedule your appointment.

Step 5:

  • For your Visa Application Centre appointment, you will need to bring:
    • A passport valid for travel to the United States with validity dates at least six months beyond your intended period of stay in the United States (unless country-specific agreements provide exemptions). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person desiring a visa must submit an application.
    • Your DS-160 confirmation page.
    • Your appointment confirmation page.
    • One photograph as per U.S. visa specifications if the applicant is under 14 years of age. See the Photos and Fingerprints page for more details.

Step 6:

  • Following your visit to the Visa Application Centre to have your photo and fingerprints taken, you will then visit the U.S. Embassy or Consulate on the date and time of your visa interview. You must bring:
    • A printed copy of your appointment letter.
    • Your DS-160 confirmation page
    • Your current and all old passports
    • Supporting Documents as per your visa type
    • Applications without all of these items will not be accepted.

Note: Children under 14 years of age are not required to attend the appointment at the Visa Application Centre or visa interview at the Embassy/Consulate. Accompany/Guardians/Parents can carry the above documents.

GENERAL REQUIRED DOCUMENTS

  1. 1.Current Passport valid for travel to the United States. The passport must be valid for at least six months beyond the period of stay in the United States (unless exempt by country-specific agreements.)
  2. Passport containing the most recently issued U.S. Visa (if applicable).
  3. Nonimmigrant Visa Application, Form DS-160 confirmation page.
  4. Confirmation and Instructions page printed from this website
  5. One 5 x 5 cm (or 2" x 2") color photo taken within the last 6 months.
  6. Accompanying family members, unless entering the United States for another purpose, should present an original marriage certificate (spouse) and/or birth certification (for unmarried children under 21), as applicable. Many visa types require additional documents. Please see the section below.

ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTS - DEPENDING ON VISA TYPE

  1. Visitor: business, tourism, medical treatment
    • Be ready to present the following documents, if traveling for medical treatment:
    • Medical diagnosis from a local physician, explaining the nature of the ailment and the reason treatment is needed in the United States.
    • Letter from a physician or medical facility in the United States stating the willingness to treat the diagnosed ailment, and detailing the projected length and cost of treatment (including doctors' fees, hospitalization fees, and all medical-related expenses).
    • Proof that the patient's transportation, medical, and living expenses in the United States will be paid. This may be in the form of bank or other statements of income/savings or certified copies of income tax returns (either the patient's or the person or organization paying for the treatment)
    • When attending an in-person consular interview, additional documents may be requested to establish if you are qualified for the visa. If you qualify for NOT attending an in-person consular interview, submit only the required documents specifically listed on the instruction page.
    • For example, additional requested documents for an in-person interview may include evidence of:
    • The purpose of your trip
    • Your intent to depart the United States after your trip; and/or
    • Your ability to pay all the costs of your trip.
    • Evidence of your employment and/or family ties may be sufficient to show the purpose of your trip and your intent to return to your home country.
    • If you cannot cover all the costs for your trip, you may show evidence that another person will cover some or all of the costs for your trip.
  2. Transiting the united states
    • Evidence to transit the United States while traveling onward to another country and the intention to depart the United States.
    • Evidence of sufficient funds to cover all expenses while in the United States.
    • Evidence to show that the applicant has a residence abroad to which he/she intends to return at the end of the stay in the United States. This is generally established by evidence of family, professional, property, employment or other ties and commitments to some country other than the United States sufficient to cause the applicant to return there at the conclusion of his/her stay.
  3. Crew member
    • Letter/contract from employing company stating the length of work and if possible, places of entry into United States.
  4. Treaty trader or treaty investor
    • Nonimmigrant Treaty Trader/Treaty Investor Application, Form DS-156E.
    • Documents that establish the identity of your company's nationality.
    • A letter from your employer detailing your position and stating that you possess highly specialized skills essential for the efficient operation of the firm or that you are an executive or manager.
    • Evidence of substantial trade for at least one year between the U.S. and your home country
  5. Australian in specialty occupation
    • Form ETA 9035, clearly annotated as "E3 - Australia - to be processed." Note: This form is the notification of an approved Labor Condition Application (LCA) that the U.S. employer obtains from the Department of Labor (DOL).
    • A job offer letter with salary specifications from the U.S.-based employer, indicating that the applicant will be engaged in a specialty occupation.
    • A certified copy of the foreign degree and evidence that it is equivalent to the required U.S. degree or a certified copy of a U.S. baccalaureate or higher degree, as required by the specialty occupation.
    • A certified copy of any required license or other official permission to practice the occupation in the state of intended employment. If licensure is not immediately necessary upon admission, the applicant will need evidence that the required license will be obtained within a reasonable time after admission.
  6. Academic or language student
    • Form I-20, Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (F-1 or M-1) Student Status for Non-Academic, Language Students, and Vocational Studies. The applicant will need to submit a SEVIS generated Form, I-20, which was provided to the applicant by the applicant's school. The applicant and the school official must sign the I-20 form.
    • The Student and Exchange Visa Information System (SEVIS) I-901 fee receipt.
    • When attending an in-person consular interview, additional documents may be requested to establish if you are qualified for the visa. If you qualify for NOT attending an in-person consular interview, submit only the required documents specifically listed on the instruction page.

    For example, additional requested documents for an in-person interview may include evidence of:

    • The purpose of your trip
    • Your intent to depart the United States after your trip; and/or
    • Your ability to pay all the costs of your trip.
    • Evidence of your employment and/or family ties may be sufficient to show the purpose of your trip and your intent to return to your home country.
    • If you cannot cover all the costs for your trip, you may show evidence that another person will cover some or all of the costs for your trip.
  7. Temporary worker
    • Receipt Number for your approved petition as it appears on your Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker Form I-129 or Notice of Action Form I-797 from USCIS (does not apply to H1B1 visa applicants).
    • Job offer from United States employer and a Certified Department of Labor approved application (applies to H1B1 visa applicants only).
  8. Media and journalists
    • Proof of employment
    • A copy of the official Press-ID, if applicable
  9. Exchange visitor
    • Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor Status, Form DS-2019 - A SEVIS-generated Form DS-2019 is provided by the program sponsor after the sponsor enters the exchange visitor's information into the SEVIS system. All exchange visitors, including spouses and minor children, must be registered in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). Each person receives a separate Form DS-2019.
    • Training/Internship Placement Plan, Form DS-7002 - In addition to the Form DS 2019, participants in the J-1 Trainee and Intern categories require Form DS 7002 (based on Box 7 on Form DS-2019).
    • The Student and Exchange Visa Information System (SEVIS) I-901 fee receipt.
    • When attending an in-person consular interview, additional documents may be requested to establish if you are qualified for the visa. If you qualify for NOT attending an in-person consular interview, submit only the required documents specifically listed on the instruction page.

    For example, additional requested documents for an in-person interview may include evidence of:

    • The purpose of your trip
    • The purpose of your trip
    • Your ability to pay all the costs of your trip.
    • Evidence of your employment and/or family ties may be sufficient to show the purpose of your trip and your intent to return to your home country.
    • If you cannot cover all the costs for your trip, you may show evidence that another person will cover some or all of the costs for your trip.
  10. Intracompany transferee
    • Receipt Number for your approved petition as it appears on your Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, Form I-129, or Notice of Action, Form I-797, from USCIS.
    • If you are included in an L blanket petition, you must bring Form I-129S, Nonimmigrant Petition Based on Blanket L Petition, to your interview.
    • The principal applicant of an L blanket petition is required to pay USD $500 fraud prevention and detection fee at the time of the interview.
    • In addition, certain applicants with blanket L1 petitions may be required to pay additional fees.
  11. Vocational/nonacademic student
    • Form I-20 - The school will send a SEVIS-generated Form I-20 once they have entered the student's information in the SEVIS database. The student and the school official must sign the Form I-20. All students, their spouse and minor children, if they intend to reside in the United States with the student, must be registered in the Student and Exchange Visitor System (SEVIS). Each person receives an individual Form I-20.
    • The Student and Exchange Visa Information System (SEVIS) I-901 fee receipt.
    • When attending an in-person consular interview, additional documents may be requested to establish if you are qualified for the visa. If you qualify for NOT attending an in-person consular interview, submit only the required documents specifically listed on the instruction page.

    For example, additional requested documents for an in-person interview may include evidence of:

    • The purpose of your trip
    • Your intent to depart the United States after your trip; and/or
    • Your ability to pay all the costs of your trip.
    • Evidence of your employment and/or family ties may be sufficient to show the purpose of your trip and your intent to return to your home country.
    • If you cannot cover all the costs for your trip, you may show evidence that another person will cover some or all of the costs for your trip.
  12. Alien with extraordinary ability
    • Receipt Number for your approved petition as it appears on your Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, Form I-129, or Notice of Action, Form I-797, from USCIS.
  13. Internationally recognized alien
    • Receipt Number for your approved petition as it appears on your Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, Form I-129, or Notice of Action, Form I-797, from USCIS.
  14. Cultural exchange visitor
    • Receipt Number for your approved petition as it appears on your Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, Form I-129, or Notice of Action, Form I-797, from USCIS.
    • When attending an in-person consular interview, additional documents may be requested to establish if you are qualified for the visa. If you qualify for NOT attending an in-person consular interview, submit only the required documents specifically listed on the instruction page.

    For example, additional requested documents for an in-person interview may include evidence of:

    • The purpose of your trip
    • Your intent to depart the United States after your trip; and/or
    • Your ability to pay all the costs of your trip.
    • Evidence of your employment and/or family ties may be sufficient to show the purpose of your trip and your intent to return to your home country.
    • If you cannot cover all the costs for your trip, you may show evidence that another person will cover some or all of the costs for your trip.
  15. Religious worker
    • Receipt Number for your approved petition as it appears on your Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, Form I-129, or Notice of Action, Form I-797, from USCIS.
  16. Victim of trafficking
    • Form I-797, Notice of Action, from USCIS indicating approval of Form I-914, Supplement A
  17. (Td/tn) Nafta professional
    • Proof of employment
  18. Victim of criminal activity
    • Form I-797, Notice of Action, from USCIS indicating approval of a U nonimmigrant petition

VISA FEES

Current Consular Exchange Rate: Current Rate Valid Through:
70.00 INR = 1 USD 05/01/2017
Visitor visa – maximum fee for family 500

Application fee amount sorted by fee class:

Fee Amount (in USD) Fee Amount (in INR) Visa Type Description
$160 11200.00 B Business/Tourist
$160 11200.00 C-1 Transit
$160 11200.00 D Ship/Airline Crew
$160 11200.00 F Student (academic)
$160 11200.00 I Journalist and Media
$160 11200.00 J Exchange Visitors
$160 11200.00 M Student (vocational)
$160 11200.00 TN/TD NAFTA Professionalsa
$160 11200.00 F Journalist and Media
$190 13300.00 H Temporary/Seasonal Workers and Employment, Trainees
$190 13300.00 L Intracompany Transferees
$190 13300.00 Persons with Extraordinary Ability
$190 13300.00 P Athletes. Artists & Entertainers
$190 13300.00 Q International Cultural Exchange
$190 13300.00 R Religious Worker
$265 18550.00 K Fiancé(e) or Spouse of U.S. Citizen
$205 14350.00 E Treaty Trader/Investor, Australian Professional Specialty

Application fee amount sorted by visa type

>
Visa Type Description Fee Amount (in USD) Fee Amount (in INR)
B Business/Tourist $160 11200.00
C-1 Transit $160 11200.00
D Ship/Airline Crew $160 11200.00
E Treaty Trader/Investor, Australian Professional Specialty $205 14350.00
F Student (academic) $160 11200.00
H Temporary/Seasonal Workers and Employment, Trainees $190 13300.00
I Journalist and Media $160 11200.00
J Exchange Visitors $160 11200.00
K Fiancé(e) or Spouse of U.S. Citizen $265 18550.00
L Intracompany Transferees $190 13300.00
M Student (vocational) $160 11200.00
O Persons with Extraordinary Ability $190 13300.00
P Athletes. Artists Entertainers $190 13300.00
Q International Cultural Exchange $190 13300.00
R Religious Worker $190 13300.00
TN/TD NAFTA Professionalsa $160 11200.00

PASSPORT AND USA VISA

Passport

  • All nationals require passport valid for at least six months from the date on which the holder enters the USA. However, for nationals included in the Visa Waiver Program, passports must be valid for at least 90 days from date of entry.All travelers entering the USA under the Visa Waiver Program require individual machine-readable passports
USA visa

USA Visa

  • Travelers not in possession of machine-readable passports will require a valid USA entry visa.
  • All visas have to be applied for at the American embassy in your home country.
  • Permission to visit the United States must be obtained through the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).
  • The United States issues a confusing range of visas that are broadly divided into immigrant (permanent resident) and non-immigrant (temporary resident) visas. An immigrant visa gives the right to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis and to qualify for US citizenship after five years of residence. A non-immigrant visa allows the individual to enter and remain in the United States on a temporary basis (e.g., from six months to five years) and to accept employment in certain cases. This visa is generally used for tourism, medical treatment, business, temporary work or study.
  • Nowhere are immigration practices and procedures more complicated and arduous than in the United States. At the last count, there were almost 60 types of temporary visas for the United States, in addition to several routes to permanent residency, or “the green card” as it is more commonly called. The greatest difficulty faced by individuals wanting to enter to the United States is which visa they should apply for. US immigration law is very complex and can sometimes be very confusing. You will need to take expert advice.

OTHER USA VISA INFO

  • If your USA job search and application for the USA visa and USA work permit have been successful, you should start preparing for the USA job interview.
  • Do not forget to take a look at USA dress code because how you dress is the one of the most important attribute in being hired.
  • Check the job interview tips do's and don'ts, and find out why people are not hired for available jobs.
  • In addition, on the international info, job search, visa, work permit, cover letter, CV & resume, job interview and dress code pages you will find many useful tips for overseas job seekers.
usa visitor visa

Good luck with your USA visa!



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