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Dictionary construction with zip

  • We can use zip to generate dictionaries when the keys and values must be computed at runtime.
  • In general, we can make a dictionary by typing in the dictionary literals:
>>> D1 = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}
>>> D1
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}
>>> 
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  • Or we can make it by assigning values to keys:
>>> D1 = {}
>>> D1['a'] = 1
>>> D1['b'] = 2
>>> D1['c'] = 3
>>> D1
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}
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  • However, there are cases when we get the keys and values in lists at runtime. For instance like this:
>>> keys = ['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> values = [1, 2, 3]
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How can we construct a dictionary from those lists of keys and values ?

  • Now it's time to use zip. First, we zip the lists and loop through them in parallel like this:
>>> list(zip(keys,values))
[('a', 1), ('b', 2), ('c', 3)]

>>> D2 = {}
>>> for (k,v) in zip(keys, values):
...     D2[k] = v
... 
>>> D2
{'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
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  • Note that making a dictionary like that only works for Python 3.x.
  • There is another way of constructing a dictionary via zip that's working for both Python 2.x and 3.x. We make a dict from zip result:
>>> D3 = dict(zip(keys, values))
>>> D3
{'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
  • Python 3.x introduced dictionary comprehension, and we'll see how it handles the similar case.

Dictionary Comprehension

  • As in the previous section, we have two lists:
>>> keys = ['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> values = [1, 2, 3]
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  • Now we use dictionary comprehension (Python 3.x) to make dictionary from those two lists:
>>> D = { k:v for (k,v) in zip(keys, values)}
>>> D
{'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
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  • It seems require more code than just doing this:
>>> D = dict(zip(keys, values))
>>> D
{'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
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  • However, there are more cases when we can utilize the dictionary comprehension. For instance, we can construct dictionary from one list using comprehension:
>>> D = {x: x**2 for x in [1,2,3,4,5]}
>>> D
{1: 1, 2: 4, 3: 9, 4: 16, 5: 25}

>>> D = {x.upper(): x*3 for x in 'abcd'}
>>> D
{'A': 'aaa', 'C': 'ccc', 'B': 'bbb', 'D': 'ddd'}
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  • When we want initialize a dict from keys, we do this:
>>> D = dict.fromkeys(['a','b','c'], 0)
>>> D
{'a': 0, 'c': 0, 'b': 0}
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  • We can use dictionary comprehension to do the same thing;
>>> D = {k: 0 for k in ['a','b','c']}
>>> D
{'a': 0, 'c': 0, 'b': 0}
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  • We sometimes generate a dict by iterating each element:
>>> D = dict.fromkeys('dictionary')
>>> D
{'a': None, 'c': None, 'd': None, 'i': None, 'o': None, 'n': None, 'r': None, 't': None, 'y': None}
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  • If we use comprehension:
>>> D = {k:None for k in 'dictionary'}
>>> D
{'a': None, 'c': None, 'd': None, 'i': None, 'o': None, 'n': None, 'r': None, 't': None, 'y': None}
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Simple zip()

  • The following example calculates Hamming distance. Hamming distance is the number of positions at which the corresponding symbols are different. It's defined for two strings of equal length.
def hamming(s1,s2):
    if len(s1) != len(s2):
        raise ValueError("Not defined - unequal lenght sequences")
    return sum(c1 != c2 for c1,c2 in zip(s1,s2))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print(hamming('toned', 'roses'))            # 3
    print(hamming('2173896', '2233796'))        # 3
    print(hamming('0100101000', '1101010100'))  # 6
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Conditional zip()

>>> x = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> y = [11,12,13,14,15]
>>> condition = [True,False,True,False,True]
>>> [xv if c else yv for (c,xv,yv) in zip(condition,x,y)]
[1, 12, 3, 14, 5]
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  • The same thing can be done using NumPy's where:
>>> import numpy as np
>>> np.where([1,0,1,0,1], np.arange(1,6), np.arange(11,16))
array([ 1, 12,  3, 14,  5])
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